Oman Tourism Seminar presentation
Oman Tourism Seminar presentation
  • Staff reporter Shin Whan-chul
  • 승인 2018.03.08 15:10
  • 댓글 0
이 기사를 공유합니다

Oman Tourism Seminar

To explain how to get there Oman as well as what to 

enjoy in Oman for potential tourists in Korea, Oman 

Embassy & Air Oman held an Oman Tourism Seminar on 

March 7th afternoon at the Oman Embassy Seoul. The 

following are excertps from the Seminar. –Ed.

HOW TO GET THERE

GETTING THERE AND AWAY

Getting to Oman is easier than you might think. Muscat 

International Airport is accessible by short flights from 

neighbouring Abu Dhabi and Dubai, and nearby Qatar, 

as well as from a number of popular Asian cities serviced 

by direct flights from Australia and New Zealand, there are 

many options to suit almost any traveller.

 

Oman Amb. Mohamed Alharthy delivering 

his welcome remarks for participants at the Embassy.

A second international airport can be found in Salalah in 

the south of the country. This airport receives air services 

from Muscat as well as regular direct flights from Doha and 

Dubai which increase during the Khareef (Monsoon) season.

In Musandam in the far north of Oman, Khasab Airport is 

serviced by daily flights from Muscat International Airport 

operated by Oman Air.

New regional airports are being built at Sohar, Ras al Hadd 

and the increasingly important port of Duqm.

 

FROM THE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (ABU DHABI AND DUBAI)

Oman is easily accessed as a short side-trip from both Abu Dhabi and Dubai. With multiple daily 

flights into Muscat operated by Oman Air, Emirates and Etihad 

Airways, an Oman side-trip of a lifetime really couldn’t be simpler. Each of these airlines offer great value airfares 

and Emirates’ Arabian Airpass offers another popular, affordable 

travel option. Ask your travel agent for the Arabian Airpass.

 

FROM QATAR (DOHA)

Flying from Doha to Muscat takes less than 90 minutes, making 

a side-trip on Qatar Airways a convenient option. A oneworld® Visit 

Middle East Pass is your key to discovering Oman from Doha 

with Qatar Airways. Perfect for a side-trip from Doha in Qatar to Muscat, the Visit Middle East Pass 

offers flexibility and great value. Ask your travel agent about the 

Visit Middle East Pass.

 

WITH OMAN AIR

Oman Air is the multi-award-winning national carrier of the 

Sultanate of Oman, and flies 

conveniently to Muscat and beyond via major Asian gateway cities.

Since its inception in 1993, Oman Air has grown from a minor 

airline operating only one aircraft on domestic routes to a major 

airline flying to more than 40 destinations around the world.

Oman Air airfares are available from Australia and New Zealand 

into Muscat via cities like Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, 

Manila and Jakarta in conjunction with a number of popular partner airlines.

To book or inquire further contact Oman Air on 1300 730 484 

(+61 2 9286 8985 from New Zealand), email omanair@walshegroup.com 

or contact your favourite travel agent.

 

BY ROAD

By road, Muscat is an easy four hour drive from Dubai or five 

hours from Abu Dhabi. Likewise, the dramatic northern region 

of Musandam with its fjords and mountains can be reached by 

road conveniently from Dubai, a popular option for holidaymakers 

looking for something different.

 

BY SEA

Muscat’s Port Sultan Qaboos is considered the main maritime gateway 

to Oman. Because of its prime location, it is one of the major 

ports in the region and is a popular stop on international cruise itineraries.

Khasab Port in Musandam is also visited by cruise lines exploring 

this fascinating, rugged corner of the country.

Salalah Port in Oman’s south is an oft-visited port for international and regional cruise lines, with visitors 

to shore exploring fascinating historical sites, the famed Frankincense 

Trail, and lush green countryside during the annual Khareef summer monsoon.

 

HISTORY & TRADITIONS

A KALEIDOSCOPE OF HISTORY, LEGENDS AND ADVENTURES

Oman is a land of rich history and fascinating culture that dates 

back well over 5000 years.

RELICS & LEGENDS

The relics of one thousand forts and watchtowers stand as 

sentinels over Oman’s now peaceful landscape. While many have 

been left in ruins, 

a great number have been beautifully restored to their former 

glory and are open for visitors to explore. Nizwa Fort, perhaps Oman’s most famous heritage landmark, is a great example of this. 

Surrounded by the equally alluring Nizwa Souk, this impressive 

monument to Omani architecture features mazes of passageways 

linking rooms of museum displays beneath its grand central tower.

Venturing further back into history, sites such as Sumhuram and 

Ubar – thought by many to be the famed Atlantis of the Sands – 

beckon visitors with their echoes of an ancient way of life.

Of course, modern Omani culture still carries many of the 

traditions of bygone eras. It remained effectively underdeveloped 

until 1970, when His Majesty Sultan Qaboos ascended to the 

throne and began what many called the “Blessed Renaissance”.

Oman is often referred to as the ‘true Arabia’ because its ancient 

culture has been so beautifully preserved. Here, you’ll still find souks selling silver and frankincense, cattle and 

pottery, in the same way as has been customary for thousands of years.

The covered laneways of fascinating Mutrak souq, Muscat.

The Omani people themselves also have a well-deserved reputation for being amongst the world’s most hospitable. Their smiling faces testify to their eagerness 

to share their unique culture with visitors, and most travellers 

to Oman will have at least one story of remarkable local hospitality.

It is this warm, peaceful culture that has created a society that 

consistently ranks Oman highly on the annual Global Peace 

Index, as well as being named the world’s 9th safest tourism destination by the World Economic Forum 

in 2015.

PREHISTORY

Recent archaeological discoveries suggest that humans settled in 

Oman during the Stone Age, more than 10,000 years ago.

The Babylonians and the Assyrians settled in Oman because 

they wanted to control the trade routes connecting Asia with 

the Mediterranean Sea.

ISLAM IN OMAN

The early spread of Islam in the 7th Century saw the first mosque 

built in Oman - the Al Midhmar Mosque that stands to this 

day in Wilayt Samail.

The majority of Omanis practice the less widespread form of 

Islam known as Ibadism. Ibadism places great importance on 

pacifism, tolerance and respect for people, cultures and creeds. 

Ibadism is only found in Oman, Zanzibar (once an Omani 

colony) and some small enclaves of Tunisia and Algeria. Non-Muslims have historically been able to freely practice their 

own religions openly in Oman.

THE PORTUGUESE IN OMAN

In 1507, the Portuguese arrived in Oman to shore up supply 

lines and trade routes back to Portugal. In 1650, they were 

driven out by the Omani navy under the leadership of Sultan 

bin Saif Al-Ya'arubi.

Interestingly, Oman is the only ex-Portuguese colony where there is no remnant Portuguese 

spoken. An indication, some say, of the strength of Omani 

tradition, culture and national pride.

PEAK EMPIRE

Due to its strategic location on some of the world's most 

lucrative trade routes, the country - in particular the southern 

region - became one of the wealthiest in the world. The 

flourishing economy was further fuelled by trading in highly 

sought after Arabian horses and the world's finest frankincense.

Oman reached the height of its power in the mid-19th century with Omani influence spreading all the way to 

Zanzibar in East Africa - where a second Omani capital was 

established - and across the Gulf to parts of Persia, Pakistan 

and India. (Source: Sultanate of Oman Ministry of Tourism)

Staff reporter Shin Whan-chul  bodo@ndnnews.co.kr

댓글삭제
삭제한 댓글은 다시 복구할 수 없습니다.
그래도 삭제하시겠습니까?
댓글 0
댓글쓰기
계정을 선택하시면 로그인·계정인증을 통해
댓글을 남기실 수 있습니다.

해당 언어로 번역 중 입니다.